Archive for the ‘Business’ Category

Career Tip: Run From Gossip

June 21st 2010

Career progress and performance is an important area in life and through my experience in striving to improve my performance I’ve learned to find many ways to perform well in my career.  It’s not been without its share of hard work though!  And as a manager, I also have insight and perspective from the other side of expectations and performance improvements and so these career tips come from that mix of experience and from my own study and practice in my career.  Please comment below if you have related experience or any experience/stories where you have used this tip!

Run From Gossip

This tip is unfortunately well known but rarely practiced.  It’s about gossip in the workplace, the dangers of it and why you should run away from gossip whenever you detect it. I’ve written an article called, How to Free Yourself From Gossip which is a great article to refer to if you need help on implementing this tip which is basically to avoid gossip and run away from it whenever you can in the workplace.  Gossip destroys relationships, it creates unhealthy conflict, bitterness and even resentment.  There is no value in it and usually it is much more destructive than people ever know.  If you want to make your working life easier and keep more friends, you can do this by staying out of gossip and not participating in it and even staying away from it altogether.

The most important steps for this career tip and to know when to run from gossip are outlined here. First learn to recognize gossip.  Listen specifically for it and use the basic rule that you should never be talking about someone else without them attending unless it is a discussion about how to help them.  Most other conversations about a person not listening is gossip, this the easier way to recognize it.  Second, excuse yourself from any gossip by simply saying, “I’m sorry, I don’t want to talk about John unless he is here as well, so please excuse me.”  Finally, learn what people tend to gossip, when they do and simply stay away from it, excuse yourself consistently from gossip and keep your distance from it as often as you can.

Running away from gossip is a smart thing to do in your career and an important skill to learn.

Posted by Mike King under Business | 5 Comments »

Career Tip: Keep Your Resume Up To Date

June 17th 2010

Career progress and performance is an important area in life and through my experience in striving to improve my performance I’ve learned to find many ways to perform well in my career.  It’s not been without its share of hard work though!  And as a manager, I also have insight and perspective from the other side of expectations and performance improvements and so these career tips come from that mix of experience and from my own study and practice in my career.  Please comment below if you have related experience or any experience/stories where you have used this tip!

Keep Your Resume Up to Date

Weather you are in a position since last week or last century, there is great value in keeping your resume up to date for your career.  You never know what can happen and especially in recent times of the economy, things can change quickly and it a possibility for pretty much anyone to suddenly find themselves needing a resume for a job hunt.  That said, you should keep your resume up to date BEFORE you need it and you will save yourself much pain and frustration from occurring at the same time as other struggles if you are hunting for a new job. Your resume being up to date will give you the kick start you need for a fresh job hunt, whether it be online for Canada jobs, locally in your industry or via your network on social media.

This is especially true if you have been in a role for a year or more as there should be a number of accomplishments that you think about including for your resume.  Make them specific about what results you obtained whenever possible instead of the resume’s that simply list mundane tasks and impress no one.  Put some effort into updating your resume every few months or at least twice yearly to ensure you have recent accomplishments and responsibilities outlined and so that those items are passed by forgotten.

Another great reason for updating your resume as it can give you a significant advantage for review presentations or performance reviews.  Often you need to include comments or your accomplishments and major activities.  If you already have this on your resume from updating it regularly, this review will be a piece of cake.  Having details on hand can even help you to address things forgotten by your manager or extra points to highlight which can drastically help to influence your ratings and review issued.

Depending on your level of role and network you engage with, you may also find that you are often contacted by recruiters for positions or offers.  Having your resume on hand and up to date might be the difference from them pursuing you and going to the next guy.  Anyone who keeps their resume up to date is more professional and serious about their career (recruiters and hiring managers know this already) so its very helpful to ensure it is recent and ready to send out at any time when needed.  How long has it been since you updated your resume?

Posted by Mike King under Business | 3 Comments »

Career Tip: Show Enthusiasm in ALL of Your Work

June 14th 2010

Career progress and performance is an important area in life and through my experience in striving to improve my performance I’ve learned to find many ways to perform well in my career. It’s not been without its share of hard work though! And as a manager, I also have insight and perspective from the other side of expectations and performance improvements and so these career tips come from that mix of experience and from my own study and practice in my career. Please comment below if you have related experience or any stories where you have used this tip!

Show Enthusiasm in ALL of Your Work

Enthusiasm is one of the most contagious helpful traits you can express in your career and it includes enthusiasm in many areas, often areas you would not expect or perhaps even want to show. However, it can be a huge tool to rally support and encouragement from others, to help others reach higher potential with you and to keep a positive outlook for things that are challenging and risky that others shy away from and don’t dare to take risks on. The team i’m working with in my Brochure Printing company does that. Showing enthusiasm is necessary if you want to drive spirits up and to support the ideas of others in what you hear and learn about in your workplace.

You don’t always know where ideas are coming from and a general enthusiasm mustered up to push yourself into new areas can be a tremendous asset to the team dynamics. Team work and collaboration are always stifled when the work is not encouraging, fun or exciting to the team. Being enthusiastic into all the things you do will help to encourage and lead others.

The point to show enthusiasm in all your work is one you should not take lightly. Do you show enthusiasm for the work you love to do? What about showing enthusiasm for the work you are not so fond of as well? This might seem counter intuitive if you deep down hope to avoid the work, but what you may not realize is that the willingness and enthusiasm you can put into the work you would not put on the top of your likes list is critically important. It demonstrates to others and definitely your boss that you are willing to do or at least support all areas of your work and the work of others, not just the stuff you enjoy. This is important in business as there are always elements of a job that you will like better than others. Being enthusiastic about them all helps you to enjoy them more as well as it will usually draw others in to help if you are excited about something and you will likely be recognized to your enthusiasm as well.

Enthusiasm brings excitement in your work and it lightens the mood, draws support and interest for work that is otherwise uninteresting. It will certainly help you to fill gaps and is especially useful when you want to do the work your boss does since enthusiasm will always be easier to notice than dullness in your work.

Posted by Mike King under Business | 4 Comments »

Career Tip: Building on Others’ Ideas

June 10th 2010

Career progress and performance is an important area in life and through my experience in striving to improve my performance I’ve learned to find many ways to perform well in my career.  It’s not been without its share of hard work though!  And as a manager, I also have insight and perspective from the other side of expectations and performance improvements and so these career tips come from that mix of experience and from my own study and practice in my career.  Please comment below if you have related experience or any stories where you have used this tip!

Building on Others’ Ideas

Ideas are an important aspect of change and change is what drives any organization closer and closer towards excellence.  If ideas are not used to feed the company’s progress, then growth will typically halt.  However, ideas need to be shared in a way that reinforces that ideas culture, not destroys it.  Ideas are often very personal and the reaction to an idea can easily have a lasting impact that influences future behavior quite strongly.

When an idea is presented some people criticize that idea and others ignore it and come up with another idea or change it. Saying something as simple as, “Here’s a better idea, blah blah blah” is very common but in actuality, it is harsh criticism about the original idea and a way to claim the new idea selfishly.  It is subtle but very destructive.  This tip is to change your working and approach when it comes to ideas and that is to always build on others’ ideas instead of criticizing or replacing them.  Changing your response to, “That is a great idea AND we could add this or do that also” is an easy way to build on others’ ideas.  Supporting people’s ideas instead of judging them is important to promote cooperation and collaboration to work together instead of against each other.

Replacing ideas or criticizing them builds competition and quickly has people learning that when they share their ideas, they are criticized, which leads quickly to people NOT sharing their ideas anymore.  This is the last thing you want for any organization and its especially not something you want for your own reputation either.  So, support others and their ideas and build on them, adding value and leaving them the credit instead of looking to take it or replace their idea with your own.

Posted by Mike King under Business | 4 Comments »

Career Tip: Do Work Your Boss Does

June 7th 2010

Career progress and performance is an important area in life and through my experience in striving to improve my performance I’ve learned to find many ways to perform well in my career.  It’s not been without its share of hard work though!  And as a manager, I also have insight and perspective from the other side of expectations and performance improvements and so these career tips come from that mix of experience and from my own study and practice in my career.  Please comment below if you have related experience or any experience/stories where you have used this tip!

Do Work Your Boss Does

This tip is really key when it comes to demonstrating that you are interested, willing and able to advance your position.  It’s to do some of the work your boss does, especially the work that is not necessary your responsibility, yet!  When you are able to show your ability to do work that your boss does it shows you boss and their peers that you are capable of being promoted.  There are a number of ways to go about this and many are straightforward and obvious, while others may be long term learning areas, either way they are worth seeking out and demonstrating that you can work at their level or on tasks that they are currently responsible for.

There are many areas to do this and finding out about your boss’ role is the first step.  Hopefully, they are a good boss and meeting with you regularly in a one on one where you have a chance to ask them questions about their own role.  If not, you can request to have a meeting from time to time with them asking specifically about their role and tasks that you may be able to help them do or practice doing yourself with their help or for their feedback.  If you don’t have an option or are uncomfortable asking them directly, you may be able to find out from HR, your boss’ peers or simply by observing their work and learning to understand their tasks on your own.

No matter how you find out, pick some thing that they do that appear like something you could do yourself and just ensure it is not sensitive work like anything involving knowledge or information that you should not yet have.  You don’t want to pry for information that you are not supposed to have.  Once you have the task, start practicing it with or without your boss’ authority and when you are ready to present your results or take it to the next level, its important to ask them for feedback on how well you did and always make sure you are prepared to still let them control that task or stay informed even if they have an option now to rely on you for it.  Offer to do it for them whenever possible and ensure you give them the results and the credit.  This is important!  Doing the work of your boss is best when they want you to do it and it helps them, this will be seem very positively and will almost always impress your boss and open up more options to learn more and take on new responsibilities.  In the long run, this can put you in the running for promotion much sooner than waiting for it and it lets you steer your career progression instead of sitting back and waiting for it to happen.

Finding the work that your boss does and learning to do it will let you work more WITH your boss instead of simply, for them!

Posted by Mike King under Business | 5 Comments »

Career Tip: Fill the Gaps

June 4th 2010

Career progress and performance is an important area in life and through my experience in striving to improve my performance I’ve learned to find many ways to perform well in my career.  It’s not been without its share of hard work though!  And as a manager, I also have insight and perspective from the other side of expectations and performance improvements and so these career tips come from that mix of experience and from my own study and practice in my career.  Please comment below if you have related experience or any experience/stories where you have used this tip!

Fill the Gaps

This tip is really about one specific thing that if you look at doing consistently and doing everything you can in this area, you will be more successful in your career, hopefully in the short term and definitely in the long term.  The tip is to regularly seek out any noticeable gaps anywhere you can in your workplace.  These can include any number of things in numerous areas:

  • Your own performance
  • New simple roles that no one is responsible for
  • Tasks that need an owner or completion that is long outstanding
  • Addressing or raising an obvious but unsaid concern
  • Helping someone who obviously could use it
  • Offer written suggestions that could solve organizational challenges
  • Volunteer to take something new one when the opportunity arises
  • Ask people about what went well and what went wrong to know what needs addressing and repeating

Doing these things comes at some expense and if you are wise, you will identify the low priority things in your work or tasks to ensure you make the time to fill the gaps you come across.  Eliminating wasteful activities, extra work, repetitive work, non-important work, and by prioritizing your focus, you will ensure you have capacity to fill the gaps and make a difference in those areas.  It’s in these areas that you can excel in your career and make the difference in your results, your inspiration and hopefully, even in building your own internal motivation.  So, don’t sit back and let your career progress without putting in effort to find and fill the gaps.

Posted by Mike King under Business | 2 Comments »

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